World Cup Geezer

World Cup Geezer

randomhouse:

missrumphiusproject:

harperperennial:

thepenguinpress:

History of publisher logos courtesy of World Book Night!  Can you guess which one we’re partial to? 

…HarperCollins.

Sexy.

Cooooooooool.

randomhouse:

missrumphiusproject:

harperperennial:

thepenguinpress:

History of publisher logos courtesy of World Book Night!  Can you guess which one we’re partial to? 

…HarperCollins.

Sexy.

Cooooooooool.

(via nationalbook)

Hiroshima, Mon Amour dir. Alain Resnais (1959, France/Japan)

Watched this film at Cine Brasilia, having known about it, waiting to see it, hoping to. There are films you say ‘I want to watch this one day’ and you will wait until it presents itself to you, or you feel ready to asborb it. Bumping into someone I’d never called back, though she hadn’t either, I was genuinely relaxed. This did not go down well with her, though she needn’t say anything. What followed what this film about gating our savagery, herding ourselves into rationality and hating ourselves for not being able to run wild without consequence. Anyway, all this to say, top-notch film.

(Source: reel-drone, via the-hulot-universe)

Post-adventure reading

Wikipedia says: The film was nominated for numerous awards and was awarded the Jury Prize at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival.[4] L’Avventura is the first film of a trilogy by Antonioni, followed by La Notte(1961) and L’Eclisse (1962).[5][6][7][N 1] Gene Youngblood has described this trilogy as a “unified statement about the malady of the emotional life in contemporary times.”[8]


So two more to watch. I’d heard Antonioni’s photography and cinematography were the highlights of his films, and I agree there are some very well filmed scenes, especially in the city, as with the church bells, or as Sandro admires architecture. It’s almost as if to put man against the greater, larger creations, as if to compare us and find us small. The film was awarded the Jury prize, it says in the opening shot of the Janus Film release, because of the writing of a new cinematographic language. The relation of man to his environment and our weakness in relation to it is what I take away. From Sandro wishing he would be an artist, an architect to find meaning again, and his jealousy, his bitterness at seeing great works as if to remind him he hasn’t done anything but enrich himself, to the agression of the island where the film’s most important scenes unfold. 

Poster for Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’avventura (1960)

Poster for Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’avventura (1960)

Monica Vitti as Claudia in L’Avventura

L’avventura (1960)- Michelangelo Antonioni

Gabriele Ferzetti in L’avventura

L’avventura (1960) - Michelangelo Antonioni

L’avventura (1960)- Michelangelo Antonioni

Michelangelo Antonioni

After three weeks settling down in the United Kingdom, finally returning to film watching. Tonight, my first Antonioni, who I for years mistakenly refered to as Antonini.

tribecafilm:

Trailer Tunes: ‘Wish I Was Here,’ The Shins & ‘The Mute’