Must. review. films. 

Must. review. films. 

A Most Wanted Man (2014) - Anton Corbijn

A Most Wanted Man (2014) - Anton Corbijn

A Most Wanted Man

First thought coming into the film: As a German man? What about the accent? Can he?

Leaving the Curzon in Soho, I thought Phillip Seymour Hoffman as a German spy worked surprisingly well, so well, that I felt naive and short-sighted, not understanding his naturality and comfort in the role. Throughout the film, I inevitably searched at intervals for the man who would later collapse alone in a bathroom but found only a solid actor, dominant in his embodiment, a performer which made me forget he was no more. In the film, he lived a life of his own, he was Gunter Bachmann and his physical death was almost meaningless. It was as if it had no connection to the end product on display. Is that not film? An alternate reality for a short period of time, or the capturing of it? 

If good spy films seal the deal for you, I recommend you see it. Willem Dafoe makes a worthy contribution, as does Grigoriy Dobrygin in a leading role. The dialogue is sharp, with cutting replies and smart turns, casually done, present in the right moments. It’s like a car that drives as it should, in which you are all too comfortable, like a computer that works perfectly. It leaves you satisfied, and at the same time, melancholic that Hoffman hung his boots early with so much talent in his heels. 

We are left with his films. 
How much can we ask of a man?

Le Menu

The menu responsible for their pleasure features “Blini Demidoff au Caviar” (buckwheat cakes with caviar and sour cream); “Potage à la Tortue” (turtle soup); “Caille en Sarcophage avec Sauce Perigourdine” (quail in puff pastry shell with foie gras and truffle sauce); “La Salad” featuring Belgian endive and walnuts in a vinaigrette; and “Les Fromages” featuring Blue Cheese, papaya, figs, grapes and pineapple. The grand finale dessert is “Savarin au Rhum avec des Figues et Fruit Glacée” (rum sponge cake with figs and glacéed fruits). Numerous rare wines, including Clos de Vougeot, along with various champagnes and spirits, complete the menu. 

Babettes gæstebud (1987) - Gabriel Axel

Babettes gæstebud (1987) - Gabriel Axel

Babettes gæstebud (1987) - Gabriel Axel

Babettes gæstebud (1987) - Gabriel Axel

Hadewijch (2009) - Bruno Dumont

howtocatchamonster:

Funny Games is a cinematic version of the philosophical riddle of a tree falling in a forest, leading not only to a heightened sense of being an accomplice on the part of the audience but also to asking questions regarding the audience’s responsibility, the obligation to think about what it means to look at violent imagery and the pain of others and the capacity to understand the absurdity, randomness, and brutality that the violent images actually show. Funny Games is meant to lead to reflection, to catch the audience looking in order to make them conscious of their own look. By establishing an interconnection between the diegesis and the non-diegesis, the film creates an “ethical space” where the audience is held as an accomplice to a representation of violence that they do not even want to see. The audience position in Funny Games, then, is of necessity ethically charged, since this consciousness cannot arise without simultaneously revealing moral values with regard to (media) violence.

Tarja Laine, “Haneke’s ‘Funny Games’ with the Audience.”

(via once-upon-a-time-in-cinema)